Duncannon Beach, evening time

Duncannon Beach, evening time

The light by the last wave lingers on fronds

of seaweed fingering wave-wet rocks where

brim-filled pools overflow before they

empty when the water surges then sucks,

surges, then sucks. Small anemones first

finger gently, then kiss hungrily as

they sluice down passing plankton too fine for

my eyes, which greedily feast on the sands

glistening, sunwarmed, lit by the last

light of day while slow footsteps meander

with the gentle waves rhythms, rising, falling,

so calming in my ears, that crest falling

with an almost silent swish, hearbeat’s grace,

footfall pace, soothing place. Salt scented air

embraces me, wrapping me, comforting me.

All troubles tumbled away calmed first,

washed by light where the last wave lingers.

The Listeners

 

An animated version of the poem by Walter de la Mare. This is the work of Eimear Connelly, Middlesex University, the poem is by Walter de la Mare, the animation by Eimear Connelly and the voice is mine, Kevin Connelly, © remains with Eimear Connelly 2014

 

For Past Poets

In ancient Ireland poets underwent a rigorous training, an apprenticeship.  The severity of the process reflected the high status and recognised power of the poets, the bards. In this reading I have attempted a meditation upon these ancestral poets of mine. The images are all my own and taken variously in the foothills of Na Staighre Dubha, the Blackstairs Mountains and Rinn an Dubhain, The Hook Peninsula,  The dolmen is Brownstown Dolmen, Co. Carlow with reputedly the largest capstone of all the dolmens.